Wood Kemble Donne Sands Hart Murray Trail

 


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Frank William Lee and Sarah Agnes Fallon

 




Husband Frank William Lee



 
 Born: 22 Jan 1856 - Myton, Kingston Upon Hull, Yorshire, England
 Christened: 24 Feb 1856 - Myton, Kingston Upon Hull, Yorshire, England
 Died: 31 May 1939
 Buried: 



 
 Father: George Lee (Abt 1826-Abt 1892)
 Mother: Emma Sweeting Lewis (1827-1900)



 
 Marriage: 



Wife Sarah Agnes Fallon



 
 Born: 7 Nov 1858
 Christened: 
Died: 12 May 1953 - Hull, York, England
 Buried: 



Children


1 M Richard Lee



 
 Born: 1898
 Christened: 
Died: 1885
 Buried: 
 
 Spouse: Gertrude E. Johnson (      -      )




General Notes: Child - Richard Lee


Information about this person comes from the Ancestry tree of leascott64. An Ancestry DNA test disclosed the relationship between this family and Megan Epler Wood.
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John Lewis Lee and Sophia Fallon

 




Husband John Lewis Lee



 
 Born: Abt 1851 - Myton, Kingston Upon Hull, Yorshire, England
 Christened: 31 Aug 1851 - Myton, Kingston Upon Hull, Yorshire, England
 Died: 
Buried: 



 
 Father: George Lee (Abt 1826-Abt 1892)
 Mother: Emma Sweeting Lewis (1827-1900)



 
 Marriage: 



Wife Sophia Fallon



 
 Born: 1856
 Christened: 
Died: 1941
 Buried: 



Children



General Notes: Wife - Sophia Fallon


Information about this person comes from the Ancestry tree of leascott64. An Ancestry DNA test disclosed the relationship between a descendant of her husband's brother, Frank William and Megan Epler Wood.
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Sir Edmund Douglas Veitch Fane and Constantia Eleanor Wood

 




Husband Sir Edmund Douglas Veitch Fane



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 20 Mar 1900 - Copenhagen
 Buried: 
 
 Marriage: 10 Jul 1875



Wife Constantia Eleanor Wood



 
 Born: 5 Aug 1851
 Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 



 
 Father: Robert Blucher Wood (1814-1871)
 Mother: Constantia Lowther (      -1864)





Children


1 M Henry Fane



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 
 



2 F Lucy Evelyn Fane



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 
 
 Spouse: C. Wingfield (      -      )



3 F Ethelroy Constantia Fane



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 
 
 Spouse: Sir H. Runsbold (      -      )



4 F Augusta Fane



 
 Born: 
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Died: 
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General Notes: Husband - Sir Edmund Douglas Veitch Fane


K.C.M.G., of Boyton Manor
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Sir H. Runsbold and Ethelroy Constantia Fane

 




Husband Sir H. Runsbold



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 
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 Marriage: 



Wife Ethelroy Constantia Fane



 
 Born: 
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Died: 
Buried: 



 
 Father: Sir Edmund Douglas Veitch Fane (      -1900)
 Mother: Constantia Eleanor Wood (1851-      )





Children



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C. Wingfield and Lucy Evelyn Fane

 




Husband C. Wingfield



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 
 
 Marriage: 



Wife Lucy Evelyn Fane



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 



 
 Father: Sir Edmund Douglas Veitch Fane (      -1900)
 Mother: Constantia Eleanor Wood (1851-      )





Children



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Johann Adam Kettenring and Anna Maria Faul

 




Husband Johann Adam Kettenring



 
 Born: 1658 - Landstuhl, Pfaltz, Germany
 Christened: 
Died: 5 Aug 1702 - Landstuhl, Pfaltz, Germany
 Buried: 



 
 Father: Hans Jacob Kettenring (1628-1682)
 Mother: Anna Maria Von Lauten (1638-      )



 
 Marriage: 30 Sep 1687 - Pirmasens, Germany



Wife Anna Maria Faul



 
 Born: 26 Jul 1663 - Pirmasens, Germany
 Christened: 
Died: 25 Apr 1730 - Lemberg, Germany
 Buried: 



Children


1 M Johann Balthasar Kettenring



 
 Born: 29 Oct 1694 - Landstuhl, Pfaltz, Germany
 Christened: 
Died: 1 Feb 1746 - Salzwoog, Pfaltz, Germany
 Buried: 
 
 Spouse: Anna Magaretha Zimmer (1699-1748)
 Marr: 1719 - Landstuhl, Pfaltz, Germany




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Gwerystan Ap Gwaithfoed Fawr and Nest Verch Cadell Ap Brochwell Ysgythrog

 




Husband Gwerystan Ap Gwaithfoed Fawr



 
 Born: Abt 954 - Powys, Wales
 Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 



 
 Father: Gwaithfoed Fawr (Abt 0932-      )
 Mother: Morfydd Verch Ynyr Ddu (      -      )



 
 Marriage: 



Wife Nest Verch Cadell Ap Brochwell Ysgythrog



 
 Born: Abt 956 - Powys, Wales
 Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 



Children


1 F LLeuki Verch Gwerystan Ap Gwaithfoed Fawr



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 
 
 Spouse: Llowarch Gam Ap Lludocca (      -1048)



2 M Cynfyn Brenin Ap Gwerystan



 
 Born: Abt 978 - Powys, Wales
 Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 
 
 Spouse: Angharad Verch Maredudd (Abt 0974-      )
 Marr: 1023



3 F Mrs Caradwg Verch Gwerystan



 
 Born: Abt 1022
 Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 
 
 Spouse: Caradog King of North Wales (Abt 1018-      )




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Felsberg and Sallie Elizabeth Miller

 




Husband Felsberg



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 
 
 Marriage: 



Wife Sallie Elizabeth Miller



 
 Born: 1 Feb 1916 - Columbia, SC
 Christened: 
Died: 23 Sep 1994
 Buried: 



 
 Father: John Thomas Miller Sr. (      -      )
 Mother: Maude Velna Hutson (1877-1953)





Children



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David Murriel Ferguson and Thelma Ovella Trail

 




Husband David Murriel Ferguson



 
 Born: 17 Sep 1921 - Macbeth, WV
 Christened: 
Died: 26 Jul 2015
 Buried: 
 
 Marriage: 



Wife Thelma Ovella Trail



 
 Born: 4 Aug 1923 - Smyth Co., VA
 Christened: 
Died: 2 Jul 1997
 Buried: 



 
 Father: Joseph A. Trail (1893-1979)
 Mother: Cosby Mae Cline (1889-1951)





Children



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Nicholas Wood and Anne Ferrour

 




Husband Nicholas Wood



 
 Born: 20 Jan 1565 - Fulbourne
 Christened: 
Died: Abt 1646
 Buried: 31 Mar 1646



 
 Father: Edward Wood of Fulbourne Cambridgeshire (1526-1599)
 Mother: Elizabeth Chicheley (      -After 1599)



 
 Marriage: 8 Oct 1601



Wife Anne Ferrour



 
 Born: 
Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 18 Oct 1648



Children


1 F Audley Wood



 
 Born: 3 Feb 1602 - Gresenhall, Norfolk
 Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 
 



2 F Elizabeth Wood



 
 Born: 2 Jan 1603 - Bacton
 Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 
 



3 M Edward Wood



 


 
 Born: 1604 1
 Christened: 28 Feb 1604
 Died: Mar 1667
 Buried: 20 Mar 1667 - St. Dunstan's, East London
 
 Spouse: Susanna Harvey (      -1652)



4 F Ann Wood



 
 Born: 8 Jan 1606 - Clage by the Sea
 Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 
 



5 F Frances Wood



 
 Born: 2 May 1609 - Clage by the Sea
 Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 
 



6 M Nicholas Wood



 
 Born: 19 Jun 1610 - Clage by the Sea
 Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 
 
 Spouse: Martha (      -      )
 Marr: 1658



7 F Catherine Wood



 
 Born: 1 Aug 1618 - Blakeney
 Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 
 



8 M William Wood



 
 Born: 17 Mar 1621 - Blakeney
 Christened: 
Died: 
Buried: 
 




General Notes: Husband - Nicholas Wood


of Blakeney, D.I.L. Fellow of All Souls, Oxford. According to a summary of papers in the London Metropolitan Archives, "Sir John Wood (1536 -1633) sold the family estates in Fulbourne and settled in Beeston, Yorkshire, while his brother Nicholas settled in Norfolk."


General Notes: Wife - Anne Ferrour


of Goxenhall, Norfolk


General Notes: Child - Edward Wood


He became tenant of Littleton Manor in 1619. He also acquired the ruined but historically significant Middleham Castle, County York, in 1662 . According to a summary of papers in the London Metroplitan Archives , "Edward Wood was born in Suffolk c. 1604 (Will: PCC.Carr 83) and came to London some time before 1634 when the Burial Register of St. Dunstan's in the East has an entry for an unbaptised child of his. From 1636 onwards there is a steady flow of entries for the baptisms and burials of his children, Susanna, Edward, John, Nicholas and Thomas. Of these, only Thomas survived infancy. Further evidence of Edward's early years in London is sparse. According to "The Inabitants of London in 1638" (an edition of MS 272 at Lambeth Palace Library), he was living in Thames Street in 1638.

Then there have survived among the family papers two account sheets for money collected by Edward Wood for Fairfax's army 1647- 9 in the St . Dunstan'S in the East and Billingsgate area. (WFP.H) In 1657 he was an Alderman for Billingsgate Ward, and he was on the Committee of the East India Company 1655-7 (Beaven: "The Alderman of London"). In his will, dated 1658, Edward describes himself as Citizen and Grocer of London (PCC.CARR 83).

It seems probable that Edward Wood's London residence was the house in Thames Street, later occupied by his business partners and agents, John Pack and Joseph Stapley. He was certainly familiar with the house in 1663, and still stayed there on his visits to London. In a letter dated 5th September, 1665, instructing Pack to shut up the house and flee from the plague he wrote, "remove my two trunkes, the one goinge in to my chamber and the other by my beds side... . In my Closet are the Keyes of all the Chests. In the Cyprus chest in my Chamber is a Long Guilt Cupp." (262/43/58)

Many of the surviving letters sent by Edward Wood to John Pack are endorsed with an address. The earliest, dated 4th September, 1663, has "For Mr John Pack, these, in Thames St." (WFP.H) Another, dated 18th October, 1663, gives more information: "For Mr John Pack at the Signe of the Shipp over against beare key in Thames St." (262/43/7), and on a letter dated 26th October: "For Mr John Pack at the signe of the shipp in Thames (sic) neere the Costome house." (262/43/8) It might be supposed that Pack merely collected the letters from the Ship Inn and did not necessarily live close at hand. However, some Assessments at the Guildhall Corporation Record Office clearly show that the house was in Tower Ward in "Bear Key Precinct", off Thames Street. In the 1663 subsidy list there is the name of Edward Wood alone. In the 1663/4 Militia Tax there are the names of Edward Wood, Joseph (sic) Pack and Joseph " Stapli", bracketed together as "Partners". In the 1671 subsidy the names of John Pack and Joseph Stapley appear alone.

Edward Wood was still living in London in December 1659, since in the negotiations with Nicholas Townley the elder for the purchase of property called "Ipwells" or the "White House" in Littleton he was doubtful about a clause leasing back the house to Townley for four years, saying, "for anything I know, may be forced to hyer a house my selfe for have thoughts of leaving London." (262/43/17) He was still in London in April, 1662 when a bond includes a clause for the repayment of the loan to Edward "att his now dwelling house in Thames Street in London." (262/43/113) In all the surviving deeds of his earliest purchases in Littleton and Laleha m his name appears as "Edward Wood of London" from 1660 until as late as April 1664. (928/15/2,4,& 5; 262/34/30)

The earliest reference to Edward Wood actually living in the Littleton area is a Gamekeeper's Licence dated 2nd May, 1663 (WFP.H). The first surviving letter written from Edward Wood at Littleton to John Pack is dated 4th September, 1663 (262/43/1). This is in fact the beginning of a good series of letters. Between 4th September, 1663 and 26th March, 1665/6 a total of 112 letters sent by Edward Wood to Pack have survived. (262/43/1-105; 262/35/22-24: WFP.H) There are also two letters within this period sent by Edward's son, Thomas Wood, to John Pack, dated October 12th, 1663 and 10th July, 1665 (WFP.H). A further two letters sent by John Pack to Edward Wood have survived dated 28th June, 1666 and 15th June, 1665 (WFP.H) [See chart on page XI] All these letters were between Littleton and London, and concerned both business matters in London and domestic requirements at Littleton. They were often conveyed by John Loton's barge. The correspondence was apparently quite regular and it seems that both Edward Wood and John Pack sent two letters each per week. In 1665, when this was disrupted by the plague , Edward wrote that two of his letters had been returned although he had received Pack's "Tuesday letter" and "Frydayes letter" (262/43/47) . Pack frequently sent domestic goods down to Littleton by John Loton and on occasion quite valuable pieces of plate, sums of cash, etc. On at least one occasion, one of Edward's sisters travelled down to Littleton by Loton's barge (262/43/39).

It is clear from the letters that Edward Wood was engaged in building at Littleton during the period approximately October, 1663 to June, 1665. In a letter dated 3rd December he specifically mentioned that he was building (262/43/12), and his other letters include orders for building materials such as timber, nails, pantiles, lime, etc. On 28th March, 1664 he requests "scaffolding ropes" (262/43/32 & 3) and on 29th December, 1663 instructs Pack to pay the Wharfinger of Bear Key 5 "for the plummer for work donn at Litleton." (262/43/16) On 14th April, 1 664 he asks Pack to enquire "the honest price of Slit deales such as ar fitt to board the out side of a stable or barne." (262/43/34) In May , 1665 he asks Pack to send down the Glazier and Joiner "for I would fayne have my house finished". (262/43/38) He obviously felt bound to supervise the building himself and gave this as his reason for not coming up to London in June, 1665 (262/34/21). In another letter in the same month he writes, "I have men and women at worke three or four and twenty at least", and requests some Suffolk cheese "for breakfast meale for my workmen". (262/43/41) As late as November, 1665 Wood mentions in a letter to Robert Dicer that his house is "a ruinous place in re spect of the times that I could not finish nor furnish it". (262/34/13 4)

In addition to this information derived from Edward's letters to John Pack there have survived depositions by Aron Dies of Clerkenwell, Bricklayer, and Thomas Laurence of St. Brides, London, Labourer, that they were employed by Edward Wood in bricklaying work at Littleton and Laleham from the beginning of August to the end of October, 1663. (262/3 4/28) There has also survived an Award, dated 1st May, 1661 by which Edward Wood agreed to pay quitrents on his property in Littleton, and in return was allowed by Gilbert Lambell, the Lord of the Manor, "soe much brick earth upon that part of the common of Littleton...as may make five hundred thousand of bricks", and the right to have a kiln there . (262/34/5 and 928/9/1) These bricks may well have been used to build Edward Wood's mansion at Littleton. It was apparently quite a large house. There are several later references to it as a "mansion" and the 1664 Hearth Tax for Littleton shows that Edward Wood was assessed for sixteen fire hearths.

It seems, therefore, that Edward Wood moved down to Littleton during 1663, possibly as early as August, but certainly by the beginning of September. There he built a large new mansion for himself and his family . It is tempting to think that the first letters that have survived from Edward Wood to John Pack were in fact the first letters sent, and were occasioned by Edward's removal from London.

Edward apparently started to farm his land at Littleton immediately on arrival. In one of the first letters to Pack that have survived, dated 14th October, 1663 he asks him to get "a brand to marke sheepe E.W . (262/43/1), and on 28th October, enough iron to "shoe a payre of Cart Wheeles." (262/43/4) On 2nd November he requested "20 fathum of white rope of this size of the straw in the letter, for plowraces." (262/4 3/5) Orders for oats and "pease" are a recurrent item in the letters, and were used for fodder for cattle. On 29th February, 1663/4 Edward requested "50 or 60 cash "as I have much business here as cowes, horses, and seeds, barley and teares to buy besids my building." (262/43/2 7) In March, 1663/4 he ways "my sowing of pease and tares is soe that I cannot be absent." (262/43/29) In the following summer he asked Pack to send down 10 cash to pay the harvest men (262/43/48). Edward Wood, Citizen and Merchant of London had apparently decided to become a gentleman farmer.

He still retained, however, his business connections in London. Probably between 1660 and 1663 he came to some arrangement with John Pack and Joseph Stapley that they should occupy his London house after he left for Littleton, and should act as his partners and agents in London. In his will, written in January, 1658/9, Edward describes John Pack as "my late servant" (i.e. former servant) and appoints him as one of his executors. Probably Pack was already an occupant of the house in Thames Street at the date that Edward moved to Littleton, and simply took over the management of all Edward Wood's affairs in London.

There are several references in the letters to "the partable account" which was the joint account of John Pack, Joseph Stapley and Edward Wood. In a letter dated 8th February, 1663/4 Edward writes with regard to a loan to a Dr. Turner, "if you and Joseph thinke fitt to let him have it out of the partable account I am contented to adventure my halfe part." (262/43/24) From this it seems that Edward had a half share, and Pack and Stapley a quarter share each in the account. In another letter dated 7th August, 1665 he suggested that the penalty clause in an indenture should be "double what our Stock is, which you and Joseph knowes best what it is, which I leave to you to put in the wrightinge. " (262/43/52) Edward Wood also had an account of his own, which was kept at London in the care of John Pack. In a letter dated 5th September , 1665 he urged Pack to shut up the house and flee the plague. Among his other instructions he wrote, "pray putt upp all my wrightings in my closett and all them in your closett below and all my bookes and the bookes which belong to the partable account into a sack and seale them upp and leave them at my Cozen alsoe. As for what moneys you have in the house which concern the partable account I pray dispose of it as you shall thinke fitt." (262/43/58)

It is difficult to tell from the letters what was the purpose of the joint account. Loans and mortgages to friends and acquaintances both from the joint account and Wood's own account seem to have been very frequent, but a remark in one of Edward Wood's letters suggests that this was not regarded as desirable. Concerning Nicholas Townley he said, "I thinke I shall never be quitt of hime and others for borrowing money." (262/43/38) He must have profited considerably from the loans he made, however, since he charged high interest rates. On one occasion at least he charged 6% interest on a bond for repayment in twelve months. (262/43/88) There are also clear indications that some of the capital was invested, as for example, with the East India Company. (262/43/ 54 & 61)

It seems also that the three partners may well have been concerned in some sort of rope business. The house in Thames Street was either attached to or very near a warehouse and shop. In September, 1665 Edward Wood advised Pack to "keepe the shopp dores shutt" and "tis better to loose the warehouse rent than to hazard your health." (262/43/63) In August 1665 Edward refers to "the spinning upp the hempe at ould Gravell Lane" and suggests that for safety's sake Pack should lock it up together with the yarn. (262/43/52) There is also a reference to "our workemen" (262/43/52). Other evidence is supplied by a letter from J.S. ( Joseph Stapley) to Henry Leigh of Boston with regard to a shipment of "Marline" or double stranded rope, and another letter from William Greene dated 24th August, 1665 (WFP.H). Finally, an undated letter from Mr Dingley to Thomas Wood is endorsed, "To be left at Mr Pack's a rope shop." (WFP.H)

Edward Wood died in March, 1666/7 and was buried at St. Dunstan's in the East on March 20 th. (Parish Register) Among the family papers has survived a printed invitation to the funeral: "by Eight or Nine of the Clock in the Morning, by reason that the Corps is to be carried to London that day." (WFP.H) There is also a list of 102 names, written in John Pack's handwriting, headed, "The names of those that are to be invited to the funerall on 20th March, 1666." (WFP.H) This is endorsed with a further list of twenty-three names headed, "Ringes to be provided for the persons hereunder mentioned." This list includes both John Pack and Joseph Stapley.

It seems surprising that Edward Wood was buried in London at St. Dunstan's, when this church had been partly destroyed by the Fire of London , and when Edward's last years had been devoted to building a new mansion in the country and acquiring land in that area. In his will, however, he shows that his main motive was a desire to be buried with his wife who had died in 1652. He left 50 to the poor of the parish of St . Dunstan's provided "that I may have at an indifferent vallue the same vault for a burying place for my selfe and family where my late deceased wife lyeth interred." He mentions elsewhere that this was "the new vault in the South Chappell" but it is important to note that this will was drawn up in 1658, before the Fire.

The relationship between John Pack and Edward Wood is difficult to assess. Edward's letters are definitely businesslike in character and usually consist almost entirely of orders for goods to be sent and errands to be done. Pack may have been a "partner" but to Edward he was still the former servant, as he described him in his will of 1658. On the other hand, Pack was obviously trusted completely by Wood. All his money and deeds were kept in chests in the London house, and probably also the "plate and jewells" mentioned in his will.

One definitely gets the impression from the letters that Edward Wood was a rather hard man, close-fisted and dominated by the profit motive . In his letters to Pack no small detail of weight or price is too trivial for his attention.

It is interesting to note that John Pack held land in Suffolk. Is it mere coincidence that Edward Wood was himself born in Suffolk, and that both Edward Wood's and John Pack's families seem to have been living in Norfolk at the beginning of the seventeenth century?

Edward Wood, made his fortune during the Interregnum but did not suffer from the Restoration when he set himself up as a wealthy landowner in Middlesex."

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Sources


1 Summary of Papers in London Metropolitan Archives, ACC/0262.


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