Wood Kemble Donne Sands Hart Murray Trail

 


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William Wightmam Wood and Maria Browne

 




Husband William Wightmam Wood



 
†††††††† Born: 1846
†† Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 9 Feb 1914 - Weir Cottage, Chertsey 1
†††††† Buried: 13 Feb 1914 - Littleton



 
†††††† Father: Peter Almeric Leheup Wood (1816-1897)
†††††† Mother: Caroline Elizabeth Wightman (      -1872)



 
†††† Marriage: 1887



Wife Maria Browne



 
†††††††† Born: 
†††Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 
†††††††Buried: 



Children



General Notes: Husband - William Wightmam Wood


County Court Judge, Barrister-at-Law, Judge of Leicester Circuit
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John Studholme Brownrigg

 




Husband John Studholme Brownrigg



 
†††††††† Born: 
†††Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 
†††††††Buried: 
 
†††† Marriage: 

Events

1. Occupation: M.P. for Boston.




Wife



 
†††††††† Born: 
†††Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 
†††††††Buried: 



Children


1 F Sophia Brownrigg



 
†††††††† Born: 6 Nov 1816
†† Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 28 Jan 1906
†††††† Buried: 
 
†††††† Spouse: Charles Alexander Wood (1810-1890)
†††††††† Marr: 25 Jun 1838




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Charles Alexander Wood and Sophia Brownrigg

 




Husband Charles Alexander Wood



 
†††††††† Born: 11 Nov 1810
†† Christened: 23 Dec 1810 - Littleton
†††††††† Died: 7 Apr 1890 - Builth, Breconshire
†††††† Buried: 



 
†††††† Father: Thomas Wood (1777-1860)
†††††† Mother: Caroline Stewart (1781-1865)



 
†††† Marriage: 25 Jun 1838



Wife Sophia Brownrigg



 
†††††††† Born: 6 Nov 1816
†† Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 28 Jan 1906
†††††† Buried: 



 
†††††† Father: John Studholme Brownrigg (      -      )
†††††† Mother: 





Children


1 F Elizabeth Wood



 
 ††††††††Born: 1839
†† Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 16 Feb 1867
†††††† Buried: 
 
†††††† Spouse: Ernest Villiers (      -      )
†††††††† Marr: 10 Apr 1866



2 M Edward Alexander Wood



 
†††††††† Born: 8 May 1841
†† Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 22 May 1898
†††††† Buried: 
 
†††††† Spouse: Janet Alexander (1850-1922)
†††††††† Marr: 17 Jun 1871



3 M Charles Robert Wood



 
†††††††† Born: 16 Feb 1844
†† Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 30 Dec 1908
†††††† Buried: 
 



4 F Mable Sophia Wood



 
†††††††† Born: 19 Aug 1853
†† Christened: 
†††††††††Died: Dec 1931 - Bournemouth
†††††† Buried: 
 




General Notes: Husband - Charles Alexander Wood


Sir Charles Alexander Wood, Knight, Deputy Chairman of Great Western Railway and commisioner of emigration.


General Notes: Child - Edward Alexander Wood


Maj. Gen. C.B., late 10th Hussars


General Notes: Child - Charles Robert Wood


Cpt (R.N.)
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Robert Nigel Bright Brunt and Joan Butler

 




Husband Robert Nigel Bright Brunt



 
†††††††† Born: 
†††Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 
†††††††Buried: 
 
†††† Marriage: 1943



Wife Joan Butler



 
†††††††† Born: 1908
†† Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 
†††††††Buried: 



 
†††††† Father: Richard Pearce Butler OBE DL JP 11th Bart (1872-1955)
†††††† Mother: Alice Dudley Leigh (1874-1965)





Children



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John Sutton and Amy Budd

 




Husband John Sutton



 
†††††††† Born: 
†††Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 
†††††††Buried: 
 
†††† Marriage: 



Wife Amy Budd



 
†††††††† Born: 
†††Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 
†††††††Buried: 



 
†† ††††Father: Joseph Budd (1644-      )
†††††† Mother: Sarah Underhill (      -      )





Children



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Donald Robert Budd and Helen Virginia Evans

 




Husband Donald Robert Budd



 
†††††††† Born: 8 Aug 1919 - Franklin County, Ohio
†† Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 17 Feb 1997 - Franklin County, Ohio
†††††† Buried: 
 
†††† Marriage: 



Wife Helen Virginia Evans



 
†††††††† Born: 29 Jul 1917 - Smyth Co., VA
†† Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 8 Jun 1998 - Columbus Ohio
†††††† Buried: 



 
†† ††††Father: Thomas Vetis Evans (1888-1917)
†††††† Mother: Grace Louella Goodman (1894-1974)




 
 Other Spouse: Wallace Trigg Chatman (1912-1956) - 1935 - McDowell County, WV



Children



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John Sutton and Emme Budd

 




Husband John Sutton



 
†††††††† Born: 1710-1713
†† Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 12 Feb 1753
†††††† Buried: 

†† Will


 
†††††† Father: Robert Sutton (Bef 1670-Bef 1725)
†††††† Mother: Hannah (      -      )



 
†††† Marriage: 



Wife Emme Budd



 
†††††††† Born: 1712-1715
†† Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 24 Jan 1771
†††††† Buried:- Rye Neck Cemetery



Children


1 M Robert Sutton



 
†††††††† Born: 1730-1731
†† Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 1800-1814
†††††† Buried: 
 
†††††† Spouse: Phebe Gedney (      -      )
†††††††† Marr: 4 Nov 1758



2 M William Sutton



 
†††††††† Born: 1734
†† Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 30 Aug 1780
†††††† Buried:- Sands Point, Long Island, NY
 
†††††† Spouse: Mary Sands (1733-1793)
†††††††† Marr: 18 Apr 1779 - St. George's Church, Hempstead, LI, NY 2
 
†††††† Spouse: Tamar Gedney (      -      )
†††††††† Marr: 9 Apr 1757




General Notes: Husband - John Sutton


For more on John, see entry for son William


General Notes: Wife - Emme Budd


According to "Tombstone Inscriptions from 5 Cemeteries in Rye New York" by Frances Ferdinand Spies, page 283 (located in the Westchester Historical Society Collection at the Westhchester Archives), John Sutton's wife is identified as Emme Budd but it is unclear if that was her maiden name or a married name from a second marriage.


General Notes: Child - Robert Sutton


For more on Robert, see entry for brother William.


General Notes: Child - William Sutton


There are numerous sources referring to William Sutton of Mamaroneck, Westchester or Cow Neck/Hempstead on Long Island. One group of sources refers to a gentleman of Mamaroneck, born about 1733, who married Tamar Gedney on April 9, 1757 and whose will was probated on December 6, 1784 in Westchester County. e.g. "The Families of the Colonial Town of Philipsburgh, Vol. 2, Author: Grenville C. Mackenzie manuscript at Westchester County Archives in their NY Historical Society Collection, page 667). Another group of sources refers to a loyalist, William Sutton, who held a "killing bee" at his farm on de Lancey's Neck [now known as Orienta Point on the South side of Mamaroneck harbor] in late 1775, during which he and his neighbors slaughtered cattle to ship to Boston in support of the British Army of General Gage. e.g. "History of the Town of Mamaroneck in the County of Westchester and State of New York" by Edward F. de Lancey (1886), page 30). Lastly, there is a group of sources that refers to a William Sutton of Cow Neck [now Sands Point, Long Island] who married Mary Sands at Saint George's Church in Hempstead on April 18, 1779 (see Saint George's Church Registry of Marriages) and died on August 30, 1780 and was buried in the Sands family cemetery on Sands Point. Based upon his age, as set forth on his gravestone, this William Sutton can be estimated to have been born about 1735.(see Long Island Cemeteries by Josephine C. Frost - from survey of Long Island Graves circa 1900).

Perhaps, due to the feeling that there was insufficient evidence to precisely identify the relationship between the William Suttons referred to in these three sets of sources, genealogists have asserted that they are three different people. Genealogists have advanced the theory that the William Sutton who married Mary Sands was the brother or son of Joseph Sutton (born before 1695) who married Mary Sands, daughter of James Sands (1662-1732). (see "Descendants of James Sands of Block Island" compiled by Malcolm Sands Wilson (1949), page 5). If he was a brother, he would have been the son of Robert Sutton (born before 1670 and died before January 23, 1725 on Cow Neck). Robert Sutton had 12 known children, none named William, and is believed to have died before the William Sutton who married Mary Sands was born. The theory that he is the son of Joseph and Mary (Sands) Sutton is based upon the fact that he was buried in the Sands family cemetery. However, there are many people buried in this cemetery that are spouses who are not Sands by blood. The Joseph Sutton who was married to Mary (Sands) Sutton did have a son, William, but he was born in 1730, married Dorcas Clapp in 1758 and died in 1764 long before the William Sutton who married Mary Sands. (See Long Island Cemeteries supra and The Families of the Colonial Town of Philipsburgh, Vol. 2, supra, pages 665-667)

Actually, there is no evidence that these three sets of sources refer to different people. When all the sources are examined carefully together, they contain compelling circumstantial evidence that all three sets of sources are referring to the same person. First, let us dispense with the argument that the birth years conflict. Sources place the birth date of the William Sutton, who married Tamar Gedney, as about 1733. As with the birth year of William Sutton, buried at Sands Point, this estimate is, presumably, based upon his age as set forth in some document. Therefore, the actual year of birth could be 1734, depending on when the birth date was in relation to the date of the relevant document. The same is true for the estimate of 1735 based upon his age as set forth on his grave marker at Sands Point. The actual birth date could be 1734. In fact, when all the documents are considered together, it is reasonable to estimate the birth year for William Sutton as 1734.

Next, let's consider the evidence concerning date of death. Williamís original will , probated December 6, 1784, (a copy of which I was able to obtain from the NY State archives) mentions, among others, his wife, Tamar, his brother Robert, and son John. One might ask, if this is the same William Sutton who married Mary Sands on Long Island and died in 1780, why was the will not probated until 1784. An examination of probate records from this period supplies the answer. The Revolutionary War ended in 1783. There is considerable evidence that probate of wills was curtailed during the war and that some people waited till after the war to probate wills. There may have been another reason why William Sutton's family delayed probating his will, assuming he was a loyalist. During the war, the property of loyalists in Westchester was being seized or destroyed. (see <http://www.redcoat.me.uk/loyalists.htm > ) As we will see, William's son, John, who is named in the will, was, also accused of being a loyalist.

The important thing to note is that, according to the abstract, the will was written in December 1775. The date of death of William's wife, Tamar, is unknown. So, it is quite possible that she could have died before William married Mary Sands in 1779. It is, also, important to note that, throughout the sizable amount of references concerning William Sutton of Mamaroneck, no source tries to distinguish between two William Suttons of Mamaroneck. Indeed, William was a very prominent citizen in Mamaroneck. "Early Town Records of Mamaroneck 1697-1881" edited and transcribed by Mary O'Connor English, reflects his activities as a land developer and co-owner of a major storehouse on the harbor in the 1760's. ( pages 22-23, 26-27, 52-53, 56-81, and 80-84).

His father, John Sutton, had died on February 12, 1753 ("Tombstone Inscriptions from 5 Cemeteries in Rye, NY" by Frances Ferdinand Spies, manuscript at Westchester County Archives in their NY Historical Society Collection). His will had left William an interest in the family's substantial land holdings on Cow Neck. Abstracts of Wills Vol. IV 1744-1753, page 321). His grandfather, Robert Sutton and wife Hanah, together with his uncle, Robert Sutton Jr., a shipwright, had amassed the Cow Neck property. ("Records of the Towns of North and South Hempstead, Long Island" edited by Benjamin D. Hicks, Vol. IV, (1900), pages 33-44 and 61-68). Robert Jr. died childless and left Cow Neck lands to his nephew, William's brother, Robert about 1750. (Abstracts of Wills Vol. IV 1744-1753, page 244). By the 1760's William's brother, Robert, having inherited Cow Neck property from his uncle, had, presumably, left Mamaroneck for Cow Neck because "Early Town Records of Mamaroneck 1697-1881", supra, refer to him, primarily, as to a sale of property in 1662 (supra. pg. 45-46) and because, as we will see, subsequent records refer to him as a resident of Cow Neck.

William Sutton was Town Supervisor of Mamoroneck from 1771-1775 ( "Early Town Records of Mamaroneck 1697-1881", supra, pages 180-182). In his book, "Origin and History of Manors in the Province of New York and the County of Westchester", (1886), Edward F. de Lancey calls William Sutton "...the leading man of his day at Mamaroneck". (pg. 155). As such, he was made one of three Commissioners to partition Mamaroneck from Scarsdale in 1774 and the Commissioners met at Sutton's house on de Lancey's Neck, where he had been a tenant "...for a great many years previously and continued such to his death about the close of the Revolutionary War". (page 154-155). Indeed, the tip of de Lancey's Neck, was known as Sutton's Point.(see https://www.placekeeper.com/New_York/Orienta_Point-977380.html

In April 1775, he was one of the prominent citizens of Westchester who signed a declaration supporting their King. At the time he was the Mamaroneck Justice of the Peace. ("Westchester County New York During the American Revolution" by Henry B. Dawson (1886), page 124-126). On December 26, 1775, Amos Mead reported to a Whig committee in Greenwich, "That at the house of W. Sutton, Esq. of Mamaroneck, about twenty head of fat cattle had been barrelled within a few days past, which, by some of our friends in that neighborhood, is supposed to be sent off for the Ministerial army and that in the same neighborhood, for three or four miles round, there are not more than eight or ten Whigs to one hundred and twenty Tories". ( "American Archives, Fourth Series, containing a Documentary History of the English Colonies in North America from the King's Message to Parliament, of March 7, 1774 to the Declaration of Independence by the United States" Vol. IV by Peter Force (1833), pg. 591).

By May 1776 brother, Robert, had formed a company of 700 men on Long Island equipped to join the English, according to "Loyalism In New York During the American Revolution" by Alexander C. Flick, vol. XIV (1901), pg. 102. On July 17, 1776, William Sutton and his son John were ordered arrested by the Committee of Safety of Westchester, based upon allegations of loyalist activities and statements made by them and by William's brother, Robert, "of Long Island". ("American Archives, Fourth Series, containing a Documentary History of the English Colonies in North America from the King's Message to Parliament, of March 7, 1774 to the Declaration of Independence by the United States" Vol. IV supra, pg. 1412). Robert was, also, arrested but was released on July 24, 1776. (Id. pg 1435). However, on that date William and John were ordered imprisoned by the Committee. (Id. pg. 1443-1444). On July 26, 1776 William wrote the Committee protesting his innocence and seeking release based upon ill health. He, also, sought release of his son, based upon his extreme youth and the fact that John's alleged utterances were after he "saw his father's substance wantonly destroyed by flames". (id. pages 1447-1448).

On July 27, 1776, John was released but William was ordered to be imprisoned in Philadelphia at his own expense. (id. pages 1454 and 1456). On July 8, 1777 Philadelphia reported back to the Westchester Committee that William was never actually incarcerated due to the intercession of General Morris. See attached . On July 31, 1779 William was reported by the Royal Gazette to be with other refugees on Cow Neck.The paper, expressly, identifies him as "formerly of Mamaroneck". He, no doubt, fled to the protection of his brother, Robert, who, in May 1778, had been made a 2nd Lieutenant in the Queens County Militia for the express purpose of protecting British controlled Cow Neck from Whig raids. ("Documents and Letters Intended to Illustrate the Revolutionary Incidents for Queens County" 2nd Series by Henry Onderdonk Jr., (1884), page 32).

Thus, William Sutton's residence on Cow Neck at the time of his marriage to Mary Sands is firmly established. Mary Sands is my 4th great grandmother, via my mother's mother Jesse Hart Sands. Mary Sands (1733-1793) was the daughter of Edward Sands (1691-1746) and Mary Cornell (1703-1762). ("Descendants of James Sands of Block Island", supra, pages 4 and 9). She married, first, her cousin, Gideon Sands (1729-1770), son of John Sands (1683-1763), Edward's brother. (id. pgs. 4,7,8 and 14). Mary's mother was a Quaker and changed her congregation from Westbury, Long Island to Mamaroneck in 1754. ("Index to the Records of New York Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends" by James E Hazard, Vol. 1.2, page 262). Mamaroneck was the earliest congregation of Quakers in Westchester County, dating back to 1685. (Scharf's "History of Westchester County" Volume I, Chapter XXIII, Mamaroneck, page 870). Ultimately, Mary's brother, Richard Sands (1729-1798), and her children, John Sands (1765-1807) and Sybil (Sands) Davis (1753-1803), all moved to Mamaroneck, John marrying Esther Palmer, a relation of Samuel Palmer, whose house served as the first Quaker meeting house in Mamaroneck. (Id. page 871, "Descendants of James Sands of Block Island", supra. pages 9 and 14-15). So, Mary Sands, probably, already knew or knew of such an important man in Mamaroneck as William Sutton before he became a resident with her neighbor, Robert Sutton, some time after her husband, Gideon, had died.

Gideon was a prosperous farmer whose will listed a farm on Sands Point and 11 slaves among his assets. (Probated May 5, 1770; Manhattan Wills Liber Vol. 27, page 491). The will provided that the farm stock would be sold when son, Edward (my 3rd great grandfather)(1759-1807)(see "Descendants of James Sands of Block Island" supra, pg. 14), reached the age of majority or Mary should re-marry. Thus, at the time that Mary married William Sutton, Edward was already over 20 and nearing the age of majority, when the farm stock would be sold in any case.

Unfortunately for William and Mary, only three months after their April 1779 marriage, according to the aforementioned article in the was seized by a Whig raiding party that arrived in the middle of the night in whale boats and carried him off to Stamford. See the aforementioned article in the Royal Gazette . According to that account, "The guards and refugees in the vicinity immediately assembled to rescue him, fired on the whale boats in which he was prisoner, and certainly did execution, as several of the rebels were seen to drop.".By August 1779, he was delivered as a prisoner to Governor Clinton. ("Queens County in Olden Times: Being a Supplement to the Several Histories Thereof" by Henry Onderdonk Jr. (1865), pg. 55). Interestingly, this account makes a point of identifying William's sons as Whigs.See, also, Gov. Clintonís account.

He, undoubtedly, did not fare well in prison because he died just over a year later on August 30, 1780. As already mentioned, Mary's marriage triggered the sale of Gideon's farm stock on Sands Point. Some time after William's abduction, Mary purchased an interest in an eight acre farm on Orienta Point in Mamaroneck. The precise location of this farm is shown on the attached map. Mary left her interest in the farm upon her death to her son, John (who probably was already the other half owner) and it was, then sold, pursuant to his will. The deed drawn by his executors is on file in the Westchester Archives. The location of this farm, between the old and the new Post Roads, was approximated on the attached map from this deed, together with the knowledge that her neighbor, Giles Seaman, a Quaker, owned the land from the edge of her farm down to the harbor, including the Richbell Cemetery, which is now in Harbor Island Park and is, also, marked on the attached map. Mary Sutton's will was probated August 13, 1793 and is in the Westchester Archives. John Sands' will was probated May 27 1807 and is in Liber F Page 275 at the Westchester Archives. The Deed from Elijah Tompkins as Executor for John Sands to James M. Hall was recorded May 2, 1827 and is in Liber 30 page 263. See, also, "History of Westchester County" Volume I, Chapter XXIII, Mamaroneck", supra, page 860).

Mary Sutton is recorded in the Federal Census of 1790 as being in Mamaroneck but, undoubtedly, arrived there much earlier. Her son, Edward, married Jane Hart on October 20, 1783. ("Descendants of James Sands of Block Island", supra. page 27). Jane Hart's father, James Hart, was a resident of Budd's Neck on the north side of Mamaroneck harbor (see attached map).("The Families of the Colonial Town of Philipsburgh" supra, and "History of Rye, Westchester County, New York 1660-1870" by Charles W. Baird (1871), pg. 411 and see also "Edward Hart: descendants and allied Families" by Clara (Hart Kennedy, (1939) pg. 16) So, by 1783, Mary was, already well enough ensconced in Mamaroneck to have introduced her son, Edward, to her neighbor from across the harbor.

It is interesting to note that both the census and her will identify her as Mary Sutton and not Mary Sands. Even though she had only been married for about a year and her marriage to such a well known loyalist might have exposed her to considerable hostility in war time Mamaroneck, Mary, not only kept his name, but moved very close to his former residence on Orienta Point.

Her motives do not appear to have involved obtaining a share of his property. On February 28, 1782, William's brother, Robert, obtained Letters of Administration for William's estate from the British Governor, who, at that time, was in charge of the British troops occupying Manhattan and Long Island.(On file in the NYC Archives) The letters identify Mary Sutton as his widow and Queens as his residence at time of death (the date of which is not indicated). The Letters confirm that Mary had renounced any claim to William's property. Robert, perhaps, wisely, did not disclose the existence of a will relating to William's property in Mamaroneck, some of which was to go to his sons, who were, by this time, considered Whigs. However, as soon as it could be done, after the war, that will was probated in 1784. Despite William's loyalist activities, I have proof that all of his assets were not seized as was common at that time (see http://www.redcoat.me.uk/loyalists.htm ). In fact, some of Williamís property was "sequestered".However, at least some of his assets passed to his children.

The proof is of an interesting kind. Although Mamaroneck had a large Quaker community and Quakers had a religious aversion to slavery, there were a large number of slaves there around the beginning of the 19th Century, including slaves held by Quaker families. (See http://slavery.larchmonthistory.org/). As previously mentioned, Mary's first husband, Gideon, had willed to various family members 11 slaves, including two to Mary, a wench and child. (Manhattan Wills Liber Vol. 27, page 491). The 1790 census lists these two slaves as still in Mary's possession in Mamaroneck and, when she died, her will left these two slaves, Esther and her child, Mike, to her son John. ( probated August 13, 1793 in the Westchester Archives). John is listed as having two slaves in the 1800 census but, by the time he wrote his will in 1807, Esther is no longer listed as property and Mike, who is described as his "servant" is to be freed when he reaches age 26. (Liber F Page 275 at the Westchester Archives).

William, also, owned a slave, Jane, who passed after his death into the hands of William's son, Joseph. Joseph freed her on July 8, 1786. (Transcription of Mamaroneck town records). It seems likely that Mary, who could have asserted common law dower rights to some of Williams property, may have facilitated the passage of his property to his children by her renunciation and, perhaps, even the production of his will, which may well have been in her possession. So it is possible that she moved to Orienta Point, not just to be close to her own family but, perhaps, also, to be close to William's family. There is other evidence that Mary was seeking to assist Williamís estate in raising money for his kids. His executors sold land to William Griffen, the brother of her sister in law, Deborah Griffin.

The connection of the Sands family to the Sutton family did not end with Mary. Mary's son, Edward, had a son named Hart Sands (after his wife Jane Hart). ("Descendants of James Sands of Block Island", supra. page 27) In 1819, Hart married Catherine Harrison, whose grandfather, William Harrison, was, like William Sutton, a loyalist. Her grandmother, William Harrison's wife, was named Abigail Sutton and she was a Second Cousin of William Sutton. It would appear that the two families remained in touch after Mary's death in 1793.

William had a sister, Elizabeth, for whom I didnít make a separate entry. However, she is referred to in her father, John's will. She married William Ritchie and her will provides further support for the relationships described herein.

 

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Jonathan Hart and Hannah Budd

 




Husband Jonathan Hart



 
†††††††† Born: 1650 - Flushing, Long Island, NY
†† Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 1711 - Rye, Westchester Co, NY
†††††† Buried: 



 
†††††† Father: Edward Hart (Abt 1616-      )
†††††† Mother: Margaret ? (Abt 1620-Abt 1671)



 
†† ††Marriage: Bef 27 Oct 1684 - Southold, Long Island, NYT 3



Wife Hannah Budd



 
†††††††† Born: 1648 - Southold, Long Island, NY
†† Christened: 
†††††††††Died:- Rye, Westchester Co, NY
†† ††††Buried: 



 
†††††† Father: John Budd (1625-1685)
†††††† Mother: Mary Horton (1622-After 1684)





Children


1 M Jonathan Hart Jr.



 
†††††††† Born:- Southold, Suffolk, NY
†† Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 
†††††††Buried: 
 
†††††† Spouse: Antje Slot Demarest (      -      )
†††††††† Marr: 1706



2 M William Monmouth Hart



 
†††††††† Born: 1690 - Rye, Westchester Co, NY
†† Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 1761 - Rye, Westchester Co, NY
†††††† Buried: 
 
†††††† Spouse: Sarah Ogden (1694-      )



3 F Mary Hart



 
†††††††† Born: 2 Apr 1694
†† Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 
†††††††Buried: 
 
†††††Spouse: Jonathan Purdy (      -      )




General Notes: Husband - Jonathan Hart


Hannah Budd (John2 Budd (Jr.), John1 Budd (Sr.)) was born Southold, Long Island 1657, married Jonathan Hart in NY, before October 27 1684. Jonathan was born in 1650. Jonathan was the son of Edward Hart and Margaret ???. Jonathan was one of the first settlers of Rye, Westchester Co, NY having acquired land there in 1685. Jonathan died 1711 in NY, at 61 years of age. Excerpts from the Book Edward Hart Descendants by Clara Hart Kennedy include: "The Hart family are descended from Edward Hart, one of the early settlers of Flushing. In 1657 he with other inhabitants issued a strong protest against the order of the Dutch government forbidding them to entertain Quakers. For this act he was imprisoned. His son Jonathan came to Rye in 1685 . He married Hannah Budd". See Edward Hart record on more details on the Flushing protest. The Westchester Patriarchs has "Jonathan Hart, s/o Edmon/Edward of Flushing; Capt., mariner, born about 166X, d after 1711, bought land at Rye 1685; m. Hannah Budd d/o John and Mary Budd. Resided Rye and had: Mary b 2 Apr 1694; married Jonathan Purdy of White Plains. Jonathan, b. bef 1702, Monmouth b. abt 169X m. Sarah. Hannah Budd and Jonathan Hart had the following children: 11 i. Monmouth Hart was born 1690. 12 ii. Mary Hart was born Westchester Co. NY 2 Apr 1694 . She married Jonathan Purdy. 13 iii. Jonathan Hart was born Westchester Co. NY Bef 1702. Jonathan is reported to have been the warden of the church in Rye, NY in 1695 and 1711.

He moved to Budd's Neck on the north side of Mamaroneck Harbor in 1685. He added to his lands on the lower part of Budd's Neck in 1702. This land was likely obtained from his father in law, John Budd, whose father, John Budd acquired substantial land in that area from the indians. See his entry.


General Notes: Wife - Hannah Budd


See notes regarding the marriage.


Notes: Marriage


The Will of Hannnah's father John Budd, written on October 27,1684 in Southold, LI refers to his daughter, Hannah being already married to Jonathan Hart. The will leaves land to the couple on Budd's Neck in Rye. According to "Chronicle of a Border Town, History of Rye, Westchester County, NY, 1660-1870" by Charles W. Baird, the couple did not acquire land in Rye until 1685. As Hannah's father died in 1684 shortly after writing his will, the land acquired in 1685 may be the land they inherited from Hannah's father. This implies that the couple did not move to Rye until after Hannah's father's death and further implies that they met and married on Long Island.


General Notes: Child - William Monmouth Hart


Will of (William) Monmouth Hart: I, Monmouth Hart, of the town of Rye , in Westchester County, being of perfect mind. I leave to my wife Sarah the use of the house where I now dwell (except one room for my son James). Also the use of 1/3 of all lands on Budd's Neck, and the profit of my right in Rye Ferry, And 2 beds, and my Great Chair, and 2 cows. I leave to my son Joseph all that parcel of land which I purchased of Thomas Merritt, lying in the White Plains. Also my sword and belt and my ivory headed cane. I leave to my son Monmouth Hart, a certain parcel of land in the White Plains, on the east and south side of the road and adjoining the lands of Elijah Purdy, Daniel Ferris , and Samuel Haight. Also my right in the Rye Ferry after my wife's death. Also the sword that he commonly wears. I leave to my youngest son, James, all that my lot, dwelling house, and all lands, meadows and sedges thereto belonging, and the use of the room where he now dwells until the death of my wife, and then the said room to go to my eldest daughter Sarah "so long as she pleases to dwell in it". I also leave him my guns. I leave to my daughter Sarah the bond from Mr. John Smith, dated February 14, 1746, also a bed. I leave to my youngest daughter, Anna, wife of John Guion, a bed and furniture. If there is a surplus of movable estate after payment of debts and funeral charges, it is to go to my wife and daughters. And I make my wife and 3 sons executors. Witnesses: Henry Griffin, Joseph Coon. Proved September 26 , 1761. Monmouth Hart and Sarah Ogdon had the following children: + 14 i. Joseph Hart was born 15 Jan 1726. + 15 ii. Monmouth Hart was born Abt 1727. 16 iii. Sarah Hart was born Abt 173 5. 17 iv. Anna Hart was born in NY Abt 1736. She married John Guion. 18 v. James Hart was born in NY Abt 1740. From "Wills of Early Residents of Weschester Co. NY" pg 356- " # 668 James Hart, Rye Neck- Leaves to daughters Lavinia, Charity, Elizabeth, Jean and Hester, 1/3 of estate, and to sons James, Elisha and Jacob the other 2/3. Mentions "brother in law John Guion. Dated May 1, 1781, Proved May 20, 1783" William Monmouth Hart. Source of name from Westchester Co Historical Society, data from MacKenzie's "Families of the Colonial Town of Philipsburg". Photocopied pages are available from: Westchester County Historical Society 2199 Saw Mill River R d Elmsford, NY 10523 914 592 4323 --------------- Sources for the name William Monmouth; First, on Page 685 of Scharf's History of Westchester County, there is a history of the Presbyterian Church in Rye. One of those signing a petition to the Governor and Council of Connecticut requesting aid for the building of a church in the town in 1727 was William Monmouth Hart. Also, William Monmouth was listed as one of Jonathan's (2) children in the book "Edward Hart and Allied Descendants" by Clara Hart Kennedy, published 1939.
picture

John Budd and Mary Horton

 




Husband John Budd



 
†††††††† Born: 1625 - White Chapel, Middlesex, England
†† Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 5 Nov 1684 - Southold, Long Island, NY
†††††† Buried: 



 
†††††† Father: John Budd (Abt 1600-1670)
†††††† Mother: Katherine Brown (      -After 1669) 4



 
†††† Marriage: Bef 1644



Wife Mary Horton



 
†††††††† Born: 1622
†† Christened: 
†††††††††Died: After 27 Oct 1684 5
†††††† Buried: 



Children


1 F Mary Budd



 
†††††††† Born: 
†††Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 
†††††††Buried: 
 



2 M John Budd



 
†††††††† Born: 
†††Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 
†††††††Buried: 
 



3 M Joseph Budd



 
†††††††† Born: 1644 - Southold, Long Island, NY
†† Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 
†††††††Buried: 
 
†††††† Spouse: Sarah Underhill (      -      )
†††††††† Marr: After Oct 1695



4 F Hannah Budd



 
†††††††† Born: 1648 - Southold, Long Island, NY
†† Christened: 
†††††††††Died:- Rye, Westchester Co, NY
†††††† Buried: 
 
†††††† Spouse: Jonathan Hart (1650-1711)
†††††††† Marr: Bef 27 Oct 1684 - Southold, Long Island, NYT 3



5 F Anna Budd



 
†††††††† Born: 1650 - Southold, Long Island, NY
†† Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 
†††††††Buried: 
 



6 F Sarah Budd



 
†††††††† Born: 1652 - Southold, Long Island, NY
†† Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 
†††††††Buried: 
 




General Notes: Wife - Mary Horton


Her parents were Barnabus Horton (1600-1680) and Mary Langton (1611-aft 1698). Mary was a second wife to widower Barnabus. The Horton and Budd families were closely connected in Southold, Long Island.


General Notes: Child - Hannah Budd


See notes regarding the marriage.
picture

Joseph Budd and Sarah Underhill

 




Husband Joseph Budd



 
†††††††† Born: 1644 - Southold, Long Island, NY
†† Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 
†††††††Buried: 



 
†††††† Father: John Budd (1625-1685)
†††††Mother: Mary Horton (1622-After 1684)



 
†††† Marriage: After Oct 1695



Wife Sarah Underhill



 
†††††††† Born: 
†††Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 
†††††††Buried: 



Children


1 F Amy Budd



 
†††††††† Born: 
†††Christened: 
†††††††††Died: 
†††††††Buried: 
 
†††††† Spouse: John Sutton (      -      )



picture

Sources


1 obituary - London Times, Feb 11, 1914, pg 1.

2 NYGBS Record, July 1883 pg. 128.

3 The New York Historical Society, <i>Abstracts of Wills Vol I 1665-1707</i>.

4 Clarence Almon Torrey.

5 (Husband's will refers to her as alive dated October 27, 1684).


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