Wood Kemble Donne Sands Hart Murray Trail

 


picture

Margarette Willes

 




Husband



 
         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
 
     Marriage: 



Wife Margarette Willes



 
         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 1860
       Buried: 



Children


1 M Hon. & Very Rev. James Wentworth Leigh



 
         Born: 1838
   Christened: 
         Died: 1923
       Buried: 
 
       Spouse: Frances Anne Butler (1838-1910)
         Marr: Jun 1871 - St Thomas, Portman Square, London, England




picture

William Williams and Anne Williams

 




Husband William Williams



 
         Born: Bef 1621
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



 
       Father: Thomas Williams (Abt 1600-Bef 1662)
       Mother: Mary Parry (      -After 1662)



 
     Marriage: 



Wife Anne Williams



 
         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



 
       Father: Edward Williams (      -      )
       Mother: 





Children


1 M Edward Williams



 
         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
 
       Spouse: Magdalen Gilbert (      -      )



2 M Robert Williams



 
         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
 



3 F Mary Williams



 
         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
 



4 F Anne Williams



 
         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
 
       Spouse: Lewis Jones (      -Abt 1702)




General Notes: Husband - William Williams


He was the eldest son and inheritor of the manor of Llangastey Talyllyn.


General Notes: Child - Edward Williams


Eldest son and heir of Llangastey Talyllyn. See Dragon and Crest


General Notes: Child - Robert Williams


of London, Painter
picture

4th Barton David Williams and Susannah Witherstone

 




Husband 4th Barton David Williams



 
         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 6 Feb 1740
       Buried: 6 Feb 1740 - Llyswen, Breconshire, Wales



 
       Father: Sir Edward Williams (1659-1721)
       Mother: Elizabeth Williams (1662-1705)



 
     Marriage: 



Wife Susannah Witherstone



 
         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 1763
       Buried: 



 
       Father: Thomas Witherstone (      -      )
       Mother: 





Children


1 U Other 2 Daughters



 
         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
 



2 M Henry Williams



 
         Born: 1723
   Christened: 
         Died: 15 Aug 1741
       Buried: 
 



3 M 5th Barton Edward Williams



 


 
         Born: 1728
   Christened: 
         Died: 12 Jul 1804 - Clifton, Gloucestershire, England
       Buried: 
 
       Spouse: Mary Leheup (1728-1763)
         Marr: 2 Feb 1749 - St. George Hanover Sq., London, Surrey, England
 
       Spouse: Mary Riley (      -      )
         Marr: 2 May 1777




General Notes: Husband - 4th Barton David Williams


Old Gwernyfed was part of the Williams' estate which increased from 1600 to cover much of the surrounding area, including the purchase of, Llyswen, in about 1730. Following the fire of 1780, which destroyed the west wing of Old Gwernyfed, the family transferred to Llangoed Hall .

Between 1730 and 1930 Old Gwernyfed and a small amount of land served as a tenant farm.


General Notes: Child - 5th Barton Edward Williams


Of Llangoed Hall. Sir Edward was 5th Baronet of Eltham & Gwernyfed. The Williams family moved their headquarters from Gwernyfed to Llangoed Hall in Powys, South Wales in about the 1730's. The family is said to have lost the manor in a gambling bout during the Regency Period (1811 -1820). Concerning Llangoed, see https://www.llangoedhall.co.uk/history/ . According to the Cardiff Times April 6,1894, pg. 3, he was High Sherriff of Breconshire in 1768.

According to David Barratt, For many years Sir Edward Williams 5th Bt. had been plagued by financial problems and had borrowed extensively against the security of the estate. By 1790 he owed at least £24,000, with interest at 5%. [in 2018 multiply this figure by 75 - David Barratt] By 1791 Sir Edward had decamped from from Llangoed and taken up residence at Clifton Wood, near Bristol. Perhaps he thought the atmosphere at Clifton more suitable for his eyes, which had latterly become sore, than that at LLangoed.

In 1795 Sir Edward, who had to cope with a somewhat feckless and argumentative son, also named Edward, tried to sell the Gwernyfed Estate. The estate included LLangoed itself and stretched from valleys on the south side of the Black Mountains to the Epynt, from Cathedine to the parish of Hay, and into Llanstephan in Radnorshire, though did not include every property in those areas.

At the time, with much unrest in France and consequent uncertainty at home, selling proved difficult, but in 1796 he struck a deal with John Macnamara, a wealthy London gentleman.

The deal was complicated and involved the outright sale of that part of the estate not owned or controlled by trustees for a capital sum of £39,000, with a payment of £8,000 to Mary Wood (his daughter), as well as two annuities. Other parts of the estate were to be leased to Macnamara for an annual rent of £1,600 on 'a lease for three lives'.

There were many other clauses, and lengthy torturous law suits followed as to which parts of the estate had been sold, which leased and which retained, which took some 30 years to resolve
picture

Edward Williams

 




Husband Edward Williams



 
         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
 
     Marriage: 



Wife



 
         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children


1 F Anne Williams



 
         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
 
       Spouse: William Williams (Bef 1621-      )




General Notes: Husband - Edward Williams


Of Llangattock
picture

Sir Edward Williams and Elizabeth Williams

 




Husband Sir Edward Williams



 
         Born: 1659 - Eltham, Kent
   Christened: 6 Nov 1659 - Elham, Kent
         Died: 1721 - Glasbury, Breconshire
       Buried: 28 Jul 1721 - Glasbury, Breconshire



 
       Father: Baronet Thomas Williams (Abt 1621-1712)
       Mother: Anne Hogbeane (1632-1664)



 
     Marriage: 9 Jul 1675 - Wolverhampton, Co. Stafford 1

Events

1. Occupation: M.P. for Brecknock for 40 years.




Wife Elizabeth Williams



 
         Born: 1662 - Glasbury, Breconshire
   Christened: 19 May 1662 - Glasbury, Breconshire, Wales
         Died:  - Glasbury, Breconshire
       Buried: 27 Jan 1705 - Glasbury, Breconshire



 
       Father: Henry Williams (Abt 1635-Bef 1666)
       Mother: Abigail Wightwick (Abt 1641-After 1675)





Children


1 M Henry Williams



 


 
         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 1723
       Buried: 
 
       Spouse: Mary Walbeof (      -1742)



2 M L.L.D. Thomas Williams



 
         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 1720
       Buried: 
 



3 M Edward Williams



 
         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 1715
       Buried: 
 



4 F Abigail Williams



 
         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
 
       Spouse: Thomas Price (      -      )



5 F Mary Williams



 
         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
 
       Spouse: Samuel Watkins (      -      )
 
       Spouse: Henry Allen (      -      )



6 M 4th Barton David Williams



 
         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 6 Feb 1740
       Buried: 6 Feb 1740 - Llyswen, Breconshire, Wales
 
       Spouse: Susannah Witherstone (      -1763)




General Notes: Husband - Sir Edward Williams


He obtained the Gwernyfed Estate by marriage to Elizabeth Williams. He was an MP for Breconshire 1697-1698 and 1705-1721. His biography in "The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1690-1715", ed. D. Hayton, E. Cruickshanks, S. Handley, 2002, is as follows:
Family and Education

bap. 6 Nov. 1659, 2nd s. of Sir Thomas Williams, 1st Bt.†, of Elham, Kent by his 1st w. Anne, da. of John Hogbeane of Elham; bro. of Sir John Williams*. m. lic. 9 July 1675, Elizabeth (d. c.1705), da. and coh. of Sir Henry Williams, 2nd Bt.† (d. 1666), of Gwernyfed, 4s. 3da. Kntd. by 1675.1
Offices Held

Sheriff, Brec. 1698\endash 9.
Biography

Married off at a tender age to an heiress, Williams found himself the possessor of a Breconshire estate that was not only modest in size (valued at a mere £700 a year) but 'very much' encumbered. Indeed, he was still trying to clear his father-in-law's debts as late as 1703, when he obtained a private Act for the purpose. He was included in the Breconshire lieutenancy in 1688 on the recommendation of the Duke of Beaufort (Henry Somerset†) and as a 'Catholic', though no evidence has come to light to corroborate this description of him. If, like his father, he professed himself a Catholic at this time, he conformed subsequently.2

Williams came into Parliament at a by-election in 1697, and showed himself to be not only a High Tory but politically indiscreet, joining Thomas Brotherton* and only one other Member on 6 Jan. 1698 in dividing against the bill for the continued imprisonment of the conspirators in the Assassination Plot. He made little other contribution to this Parliament, being granted a leave of absence on 2 Apr. 1698, and did not put up at the general election the following year, being listed as a supporter of the Country party 'left out' of the new Parliament. He intended to stand for Breconshire in January 1701, when his preparations show him to have been on good terms with the Harleys and Foleys, but it was not until 1705 that he was returned again, this time after a contest. It may be that the renewal of his candidature was a response to the difficulties he had encountered in the previous Parliament over private legislation affecting his interests: his Act in 1703 had included a saving clause inserted on the petition of a great-nephew; and his petition, presented to the Commons on 5 Dec. 1704, to secure a similar safeguard for his wife in another private bill seems to have failed.3

Classed as a 'Churchman' in an analysis of the new Parliament in 1705, though Lord Sunderland (Charles, Lord Spencer*) could only consider him 'doubtful', Williams voted against the Court candidate in the division on the Speakership on 25 Oct. 1705, and by 1708 could be listed as a Tory. He was not, however, a particularly active Member. He was given leave of absence on 31 Jan. 1706 on account of his wife's death. Re-elected without opposition in 1708 and at the three succeeding general elections, he voted against the impeachment of Dr Sacheverell, and after being classified as a Tory in the 'Hanover list' of the 1710 Parliament was included among the 'worthy patriots' who in the first session exposed the mismanagements of the previous ministry. He was also a member of the October Club. Further leave of absence was granted him on 9 Apr. 1711 for health reasons. He may not have been a very frequent attender, but he was placed firmly in the Tory camp by the compilers of the Worsley list and two lists of the outgoing Members returned in 1715. Surprisingly, he later voted for the septennial bill and was regarded by Sunderland as a possible supporter of the peerage bill. Williams died on 28 July 1721, and was buried at Aberllynfi.4
Ref Volumes: 1690-1715
Author: D. W. Hayton

Notes

1.
CJ, xv. 121; HMC Lords, n.s. v. 188.
2.
Duckett, Penal Laws and Test Act (1882), 273; CSP Dom. 1687\endash 9, p. 152.
3.
CSP Dom. 1698, p. 19; Add. 70020, f. 350; Poole, Brec. 398; HMC Lords, n.s. v. 188.
4.
Hist. Reg. Chron. 1721, p. 32; Old Wales, iii. 202.


General Notes: Child - Henry Williams


3rd Bart


General Notes: Child - 4th Barton David Williams


Old Gwernyfed was part of the Williams' estate which increased from 1600 to cover much of the surrounding area, including the purchase of, Llyswen, in about 1730. Following the fire of 1780, which destroyed the west wing of Old Gwernyfed, the family transferred to Langoed Hall.

Between 1730 and 1930 Old Gwernyfed and a small amount of land served as a tenant farm.
picture

John Daniel Williams and Hannah Sophia Williams

 




Husband John Daniel Williams



 
         Born: 1829
   Christened: 
         Died: 1904
       Buried: 
 
     Marriage: 

Events

1. Occupation: Headmaster Christ's College Cambridge.




Wife Hannah Sophia Williams



 
         Born: 1830
   Christened: 
         Died: 29 Apr 1909 - Coolinge, Kent, England
       Buried: 



Children


1 F Millicent Clara Williams



 
         Born: 15 May 1860 - Brecknock, Wales 2
   Christened: 
         Died: Abt Dec 1885 - Faversham, Kent, England 3
       Buried: 23 Dec 1885 St Mary Magdalene, Davington, Kent
 
       Spouse: William Manners Wood (1857-1933)
         Marr: 11 Apr 1880 - Chartham, Kent, England




General Notes: Husband - John Daniel Williams


Rev.
picture

Thomas Wood and Mary Williams

 




Husband Thomas Wood



 


 
         Born: 1748
   Christened: 
         Died: 7 May 1835 - Littleton
       Buried: 



 
       Father: Thomas Wood (1708-1799)
       Mother: Anne Jones (1713-1797)



 
     Marriage: 22 Jun 1776 - Littleton, Middlesex, England



Wife Mary Williams



 
         Born: 1752 - Beconshire, Wales
   Christened: 23 Mar 1752 - Llyswen, Breconshire, Wales
         Died: 18 Jul 1820
       Buried: 



 
       Father: 5th Barton Edward Williams (1728-1804)
       Mother: Mary Leheup (1728-1763)





Children


1 M Thomas Wood



 


 
         Born: 21 Apr 1777
   Christened: 
         Died: 26 Jan 1860
       Buried: 2 Feb 1860 - Littleton, Middlesex Cty, England
 
       Spouse: Caroline Stewart (1781-1865)
         Marr: 23 Dec 1801



2 M Edward Wood



 


 
         Born: 10 Jun 1778
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
 



3 M Robert Richard Wood



 
         Born: 13 Feb 1780
   Christened: 
         Died: 1858
       Buried: 
 



4 F Mary Wood



 
         Born: 1781
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
 



5 M Henry Wood



 
         Born: 11 Aug 1782
   Christened: 
         Died: 13 Jan 1871 - Torquay, Devon
       Buried: 19 Jan 1871 - Southborough, Co. Kent
 
       Spouse: Margaret Elizabeth Templeton (1789-1879)
         Marr: 7 Oct 1809



6 M Frederick Wood



 
         Born: 28 Sep 1783
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 16 Nov 1865
 



7 M Peter Scrymsher Wood



 
         Born: 26 Oct 1785
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
 
       Spouse: Frances Penrice (      -      )
         Marr: 12 Jul 1810



8 M William Leheup Wood



 
         Born: 22 Feb 1787
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
 



9 F Frances Rachel Wood



 
         Born: 1788
   Christened: 
         Died: 1830
       Buried: 
 



10 F Demina Magdalena Wood



 
         Born: 1789
   Christened: 
         Died: 1829
       Buried: 
 



11 M Charles Wood



 


 
         Born: 4 Dec 1790 - Littleton, Middlesex, England
   Christened: 1 Jan 1791 - West Horsely, Surrey, England
         Died: 13 Dec 1877 - Charleton, Pontefract, Yorkshire
       Buried: Dec 1877 - Charleton, Pontefract, Yorkshire
 
       Spouse: Susanna Mary Watkins (1799-1878)
         Marr: 1 Jul 1819



12 F Henrietta Wood



 
         Born: 1794
   Christened: 
         Died: 1851
       Buried: 
 



13 F Florentia Wood



 
         Born: 1794
   Christened: 
         Died: 29 Jan 1865 - 22 Green St, , Park Lane 4
       Buried: 
 



14 F Dorothy Wood



 
         Born: 1795
   Christened: 
         Died: 1839
       Buried: 
 
       Spouse: Tuite (      -      )




General Notes: Husband - Thomas Wood


Of Littleton Park. According to a summary of papers in the London Metropolitan Archives, "the estate at Gwernyfed was acquired in 1776 upon the marriage of Thomas Wood to Mary, daughter and heiress of Sir Edward Williams of Langoed Castle. In Middlesex the lordships of Astlam and Littleton were held by the family." The Gwernyfed estate was approximately 3,500 acres.


General Notes: Wife - Mary Williams


only daughter and heir. According to a catalogue contained in Wood family papers in the London Metropolitan Archives, an oil panting which was to be sold by auction at Brecon - (ref. ACC/1302/113) in 1850 was a portrait of Miss Mary Williams of Llangoed Castle, co. Brecon, by Vandyke. Mary brought to the Wood family a very old and prestigious Welsh heritage. The Williams surname derived from the holders of the manor of Llangastey Talyllyn. Her 2nd great grandfather, Sir Thomas Williams, Baronet, was an MP for Breconshire and a doctor to Charles II. However, being a second son, he was not lord of the manor of Llangastey Talyllyn. However, his son, Edward, married Elizabeth Williams the heir to Gwernyfed manor. This other Williams family was, also, a prestigious old Welsh family. The Gwernyfed manor, upon which Mary was born, was accquired by her 5th great grandfatther, Sir David Williams, a wealthy and influential Welsh attorney who was one of 12 members of the King's Bench. Sir David claimed descent from the Brecon Prince Bleddyn ap Maenarch. However, Mary was. also, verifiably descended from this prince by (1) his great grandson, Trahaern Vychan, who was an ancestor of the Williams of Talyllyn and their ancestors the Powells of Talyllyn, one of whom, John Powell, Mary's 7 th great grandfather, married a descendant of David Gam, the great great grandson of Einion Sais, Trahaern's great grandson, and (2) his grandson Cadiver, who was, also, an ancestor of the Powell's of Talyllyn, via Owen Gethin, Cadiver's great great great grandson, whose grandson acquired the Talyllyn manor through marriage to a desendant of the Walboef family.


General Notes: Child - Thomas Wood


Lord of the Manors of Littleton, Co. Middlesex, Gwernyfed, Co. Breconshire and Middleham Castle, Co. York. M.P. for Breconshire (1806-1847) . Col. East Middlesex Militia. According to a summary of papers in the London Metropolitan Archives, " he commanded the Royal East Middlesex Regiment of Militia for fifty six years and encamped with them at Aldershot in his eightieth year. Colonel Thomas Wood and his wife enjoyed the friendship of William IV and Queen Adelaide and the King nominated Wood to be one of his executors. Colonel Wood was host to George IV at Gwernyfed, and members of the royal family visited Littleton. Aid e-De-Camp to Queen Victoria. According to the Cardiff Times, April 7, 1894, pg, 1, he was educated at Harrow and Oxford. He was High Sherriff of Brecknock in 1809. He was Justice of the Peace for the counties of Middlesex, Surrey, and Brecon for very many years previous to his death.

According to David Barratt he spent several years and large legal costs sorting out the mess his grand-father, Sir Edward Williams, had created over the Gwernyfed estate with John Macnamara.

His biography in "The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1790-1820", ed. R. Thorne, 1986, is as follows:
Family and Education

b. 21 Apr. 1777, 1st s. of Thomas Wood of Littleton Park by Mary, da. and h. of Sir Edward Williams, 5th Bt., of Gwernyfed. educ. Harrow 1788-95; Oriel, Oxf. 1796. m. 23 Dec. 1801, Lady Caroline Stewart, da. of Robert, 1st Mq. of Londonderry [I], by 2nd w. Lady Frances Pratt, da. of Charles Pratt†, 1st Earl Camden, 7s. 3da. suc. mother 1820; fa. 1835.
Offices Held

Sheriff, Brec. 1809-10.

Lt.-col. E. Mdx. militia 1798, col. 1803; militia a.d.c. to King William IV 1831.
Biography

Wood, the eldest of 14 children, was recommended by his grandfather Thomas Wood† to Lord Sydney in 1798 as suitable to be made a groom of the bedchamber 'or any other such situation'.1 In 1803 he became a colonel of militia for Middlesex, which his grandfather had briefly represented in Parliament, and in 1806 his name was hawked about as a potential candidate for the county. It was thought that as brother-in-law of their opponent Castlereagh he could scarcely expect the countenance of the Grenville ministry. He was in any case virtually sure of a seat elsewhere. Since 1804, when his mother succeeded to the Gwernyfed estate, he had become an obvious contender for Breconshire, where he could count on the support of Lord Camden, his wife's uncle. Insisting in advance on his freedom of action in Parliament, he was returned unopposed on the retirement of Sir Charles Morgan in 1806.2


In general, Wood followed the political lead of his brother-in-law Castlereagh. He voted against the Grenville ministry on the Hampshire election petition, 13 Feb. 1807. His first speeches showed his interest in military matters, which was doubtless stimulated by Castlereagh's being at the War Office. Thus on 27 July 1807 he was a fervent supporter of the militia transfer bill, on 2 Feb. 1809 he championed the militia enlistment bill and on 18 Apr. the militia completion bill. His arguments derived their force from his own experience of militia command. A friend of the Duke of Clarence3 (who as King William IV appointed him one of his executors), he deplored the proceedings in the House against the Duke of York in February and March 1809. When Castlereagh quarrelled with the cabinet that autumn, Wood followed his line, voting with the majority on the address, 23 Jan. 1810, with the minority for inquiry into the Scheldt expedition, 26 Jan., and with the majority against the censure on it, 30 Mar. 1810. The Whigs duly listed him 'Castlereagh' at that time. He was a critic of Sir Francis Burdett's conduct, 3 May 1810, and on 21 May voted against parliamentary reform. He subsequently rallied to the ministry with Castlereagh and voted against remodelling the government, 21 May 1812.

Like Castlereagh, Wood was friendly to Catholic relief and voted for it in the session of 1813, in 1815, 1817 and subsequently:4 it was constituency pressure that determined his ultimate hostility to the measure. After the election of 1812, he knew that he would be challenged for his seat by the heir of the Morgans of Tredegar, now of age, and he was the more sensitive to local issues. On 5 Mar. 1813 he failed to obtain the committal of a bill to amend the Brecknock Canal Act, which he conceded to be controversial and which the Morgans opposed. The absence of Castlereagh on the Continent also affected his role in Parliament: on 21 Feb. 1815, for instance, he replied to Lambton's motion deploring the alienation of Genoa, remarking in his defence of the Congress arrangements that 'the pacification of the world was beyond the reach of all human agency'. He opposed the disembodying of the militia, 28 Feb. 1815, and was a supporter of flogging in the army as, to preserve discipline, there was no alternative but the death sentence. As a member of the Military Club, he defended it against those opposition critics who thought it had sinister political associations, 4 Mar. 1816.

In the spring of 1816 Wood, though a supporter of the continuation of the property tax, was critical of the government's supine attitude to agricultural distress. His constituents wished for relief from the tax burden, as their petitions indicated, and he suggested the repeal of the malt and agricultural horse taxes, 7 Mar. 1816, setting himself up as the champion of the 'little farmers', 25 Mar. On 28 Mar., insisting that legislative intervention was necessary to remedy the depression, he added grain protection, reduction of the salt tax, tithe and Poor Law reform to his recommendations.5 On 20 May he secured a committee to review the Game Laws, in view of the increase in poaching. He disliked the committee's draconian proposals and on 4 Mar. 1817 obtained leave for a bill to repeal the statute of 28 Geo. II making the sale of game illegal. It failed to get past its second reading, 9 June, and Wood could not swallow George Bankes's bill on the subject, debated in the two subsequent sessions.

Wood's only vote contrary to government in the Parliament of 1812 was against John Wilson Croker's wartime salary at the Admiralty, 17 Feb. 1817. He was in other respects disposed to criticize the opposition. When they called for repeal of the leather tax, he said he would sooner see the salt tax repealed, 12 Mar. 1818. He questioned Burdett's credibility as a parliamentary reformer in the light of his electoral practices in Middlesex, 5 May 1818. Nevertheless, he was considered sufficiently independent to be preferred by Whigs in Breconshire to his opponent Morgan, who had shown himself a negligent Member and one of the silent majority of ministerialists.6 He defeated Morgan in 1818, retaining his seat until he retired as one of Peel's martyrs in 1847.

In the Parliament of 1818 he developed his ideas, as a select committeeman, on Poor Law reform. He suggested road work for the unemployed, 17 Feb. 1819, opposed the law of settlement which discouraged the mobility of labour, 10 May, and advocated schools of industry for pauper children, 11 June. He was also sympathetic to the lot of child chimney sweeps, 17 Feb. 1819. He thought direct taxation preferable to indirect precisely because the latter hit the poor hardest, 20 May. He opposed the abolition of the Welsh judicature, 21 May. Wood, who had voted against Tierney's censure motion of 18 May 1819, went on to support government measures against sedition. He was one of the few Members out of office invited to Castlereagh's pre-sessional ministerial dinner.7 In justification of the blasphemous libel bill, 21 Dec. 1819, he said that Hone's parodies had found their way into his children's nursery, where they were thought to be 'very good; but very shocking'. He died 26 Jan. 1860.
Ref Volumes: 1790-1820
Author: R. G. Thorne

Notes

1.
Kent AO, Stanhope mss 731/6.
2.
Wakes Museum, Selborne, Holt White mss 400; Elizabeth Wood, 'Col. Thomas Wood 1777-1860', Brec. and Rad. Express, 6 June-25 July 1974; R. D. Rees, 'Parl. Rep. S. Wales 1790-1830' (Reading Univ. Ph.D. thesis, 1962), ii. 549; Camden mss C519/1, Wood to Camden, 17 June, reply 21 June 1806.
3.
Prince of Wales Corresp. vi. 2500.
4.
NLW, Mayberry mss 6511, 6905.
5.
Ibid. 6481, 6484-6.
6.
Ibid. 6479, 6509, 6510.
7.
Phipps, Plumer Ward Mems. ii. 27.


General Notes: Child - Edward Wood


Chief Secretary at Madras. He attended college at Fort William, India until 1803.


General Notes: Child - Robert Richard Wood


Home Department, Whitehall, Under Secretary of State


General Notes: Child - Henry Wood


Bengal Civil Service, Comptroller Gen. of Acc. of Calcutta. Was a Sea Cadet until 1798.


General Notes: Child - Peter Scrymsher Wood


Very Rev. Dean of Middleham, Rector of St Mary Magdalene ,Littleton


General Notes: Child - Charles Wood


of Carleton Lodge, Pontefract, was a Lt. Col. in the 10th Hussars. served in the Peninsular campaign, and at Waterloo. He was, also, present at the battle of Leipsic Arcis - Sur - Aube. He was severly wounded at Basuco during the Peninsular War and again at Waterloo. In a letter about the battle of Waterloo he wrote "I got hit just as the Duke moved to the attack and bled like a pig. I took up my stirrups in the hunting seat and made the best of my way back to Waterloo. With the assistance of a dragoon, I afterwards got into Brussels, and found a lodging in the Rue Royale. Arnold will come home with me. He was shot through the lungs. They tell me he must not eat meat for six months. He says "Wait till I get to Northampton with five hunters next November…" Quentin is going to Paris tomorrow in a carriage … Bob Manners was struck in the shoulder by a lance, and did not find it out until the next day. … You should have seen us the night before the fight. Every one wet through. We had a shower that came down like a wall. Our horses could not face it and all went about. It made the ground up to the horses' fetlocks. We got into a small cottage close to our bivouac, about a mile in rear of our positions, most of us naked and getting out things dry at the fire. I managed to get "Paddy" a shop for the night. Old Quentin burnt his boots, and could not get them on … We had to feed on what we found in the hut, beginning with the old hens for supper, and young chickens for breakfast. I see the English papers say "The Light Dragoons could make no impression on the French Cuirassiers." Now our regiment actually rode over them. Give me the boys that will go at a swinging gallop for the last seventy yards, applying both spurs when you come within the last six yards. Then if you don't go right over them I am much mistaken. …. I have found the ball which went through my thigh into the pad of my saddle, very high up. I think it hit the bone which drove it upwards…".

According to "Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry Chronicle"
1910 Page 213.
Lieutenant Charles Wood of the 52nd.
Aide-de-Camp to General Robert Craufurd.

Charles Wood joined the 52nd in 1809 and was promoted Lieutenant 7th March 1810. He served with the Regiment in the Peninsula and was present at Busaco (wounded), Fuentes d'Onor, Ciudad Rodrigo, Badajoz and Salamanca, as well as in many minor engagements. At the action on the Coa, near Almeida, he commanded one half of Captain Robert Campbell's Company, the other half of which under Lieutenant Dawson was posted in a tower and placed in a perilous position, from which it only extricated itself under cover of darkness after the action was over. Young Wood's soldierly qualities attracted the attention of the leader of the Light Division from the first, and it is noteworthy that, out of the great number of highly-trained subalterns under his command, Craufurd selected as his Aides-de-Camp John Shaw of the 43rd and Charles Wood of the 52nd. Wood was with his General at the battle of Fuentes d'Onor; and remained as his A.D.C. up to the time of Craufurd's death, being one of the chief mourners at his burial in the breach of Ciudad Rodrigo. From that time until the spring of 1813 he was D.A.A.G. at Wellington's Headquarters, after which he transferred to the cavalry and joined the Staff of Lord Londonderry as A.D.C. His subsequent services were somewhat remarkable, as shown by the following extract from a letter which, many years later, he wrote to an old brother officer of the 52nd:--

"I accompanied the Allied Army from Berlin to the capture of Paris, and am now the only English officer left who was at both the battles of Leipzic and Waterloo. I was badly wounded at the latter when Captain of the 10th Hussars; and, most curious, was the first to discover the French retiring from Leipzic, as well as the first to tell the Duke on the morning of the 17th June 1815 that the Prussians had retired. I have letters from Lords Londonderry, Westmoreland and Raglan, stating such-- showing that my time with the Old Regiment at the outposts during 1810-1811 had not been thrown away:"

At the time of his death he was a Colonel and he was in possession of the Peninsular Medal with five clasps, the Waterloo Medal and the Prussian Order of Merit, later known as the Blue Max. He is one of very few foreigners to ever receive this medal. The back story of this award is as follows: In 1813 Captain Wood accompanied Lord Stewart to Germany as A.D. C. and afterwards took part with the Prussians in the campaign against the French. He was present at the battles of Gross-Beeren, Donnewitz, Wittemberg, and Leipsic, when the French, under Napoleon were totally defeated by the Allies. On this occasion, for his report on the evening of the 18th October that the French were retiring, and for saving a Prussian General and his staff from being captured, he was decorated by the King of Prussia with the military order of merit.

His obituary in the Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer for 15 December, 1877, page 4, reports his military record, citing Mr. H. S. Smith's (Leeds) Military List as follows: "Ensign, 16th March, 1809, 52nd Regiment; ; lieutenant, 7th March, 1810, 52nd Regiment; captain, 17th September, 1812, 68th Regiment; appointed to the 10th Hussars 12th November 1814; brevet-major, 16th March, 1815; exchanged to the 4th Light Dragoons, 1st February, 1821; exchanged to h.p. of 22d Light Dragoons, 5th April 1821; major, 16th July 1830, unattached; brevet-lieu-colonel, 10th January 1837; exchanged to 52nd Regiment, 12th December 1839; retired same day."

According to a wiki on the 22nd Light Dragoons ( https://wiki.fibis.org/w/22nd_Light_Dragoons ) it was based in India and was disbanded in 1819 and replaced by the 13th Hussars. (Charles was in the 10th Hussars at the Battle of Waterloo). According to a wiki on the 13th Hussars ( https://wiki.fibis.org/w/13th_Hussars ) it was a cavalry unit based in India in the 1820's and 1830's and a number of its members returned to England to retire in 1839.

From this research I am convinced that Charles served in India in the 1820s and 1830s.

The painting of him attached shows him in the uniform of the 52nd Regiment. The two bullion eppulettes dates the portrait to 1811-12 while he was serving as ADC to Major General Craufurd or as DAAG on Wellington's staff. He would have been 20 or 21. I have, also, attached a snuff box lid portrait that Wood commissioned in Germany in 1813.
picture

Samuel Winsor and Mercy Williams

 




Husband Samuel Winsor



 
         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
 
     Marriage: Jan 1676



Wife Mercy Williams



 
         Born: Jul 1640
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



 
       Father: Roger Williams (Abt 1602-Abt 1682)
       Mother: Mary Bernard (1609-1676)




 
 Other Spouse: Resolved Waterman (      -      )



Children



picture

William Manners Wood and Millicent Clara Williams

 




Husband William Manners Wood



 


Here is a portrait from 1915
         Born: 9 Feb 1857 - Kempsey, Co. Worcester
   Christened: 
         Died: 20 Jun 1933 - Littleton Rectory
       Buried:  - St Mary Magdelene, Littleton, Middlesex, England



 
       Father: Price Builth Manners Wood (1825-1877)
       Mother: Catherine Anne Jarman (1835-1907)



 
     Marriage: 11 Apr 1880 - Chartham, Kent, England

 
 Other Spouse: Mildred Kemble Donne(1863-1894) - 14 Apr 1887 - St. James Church, Paddington

 
 Other Spouse: Gwenellen Evelyn Dorothy Chichester(1890-1970) - 4 Jan 1911 - St. Mary Abbot's, Kensington

Events

1. Education: Worcester College, Oxford, BA 1879, MA 1882.

2. Occupation: Curate of Chartham in 1881.Rector of Littleton from 1893 until his death.

3. Occupation: 1889, Had been Curate of Faversham and was appointed Rector of Church Lawford, Rugby.

4. Baptism: 18 Mar 1857, Kempsey, Co. Worcester.




Wife Millicent Clara Williams



 
         Born: 15 May 1860 - Brecknock, Wales 2
   Christened: 
         Died: Abt Dec 1885 - Faversham, Kent, England 3
       Buried: 23 Dec 1885 - St Mary Magdelene, Davington, Kent



 
       Father: John Daniel Williams (1829-1904)
       Mother: Hannah Sophia Williams (1830-1909)



Events

1. Baptism: 18 Jun 1860, St Mary's, Brecon, Brecknockshire, Wales.


Children


1 M Charles Alan Leith Wood



 
         Born: 14 Dec 1881 - Chatham, County Kent
   Christened: 
         Died: 5 Jul 1902 - Murree, India
       Buried: 
 



2 F Elinor Millicent Wood



 
         Born: 17 Jul 1883 - Davington Hill, Faversham, Kent
   Christened: 
         Died: 22 Feb 1959 - Wysteria Cottage, Cookham 5
       Buried: 26 Feb 1959 - Holy Trinity Church, Cookham
 
       Spouse: Basil Moutray Moutray (1876-1933)
         Marr: 9 Sep 1911 - Church of St. Andrew, W. Kensington 6



3 M Cristopher John Frederick Wood



 
         Born: 1 Nov 1884 - Davington Hill, Faversham, Kent, England 7
   Christened: 
         Died: 27 Dec 1963 - Yateley, Hampshire, England 8
       Buried: 
 
       Spouse: Mab Frances Kathryn Wood (1879-1969)
         Marr: 23 Sep 1909 - Southampton, England 9



4 M Max Wiliam Wood



 
         Born: Dec 1885 - Faversham, Kent
   Christened: 
         Died: 31 Jul 1886 - Faversham, Kent, England 10
       Buried: 3 Aug 1886 - St Mary Magdelene, Davington, Kent
 




General Notes: Husband - William Manners Wood


1891 census lists him in parish Church Lawford rectory in Warwikshire. He lists Warwickshire as his place of birth. 1881 census lists Kempton, Worcester as place of birth. His residence is listed as Mill House in Chartham. Littleton is near Shepperton in Middlesex. According to the January 27, 1893 edition of the Coventry Herald, West Midlands, it was about that time that William received the appointment as Rector of St Mary Magdalene in Littleton. According to the Whistable Times and Herne Bay Herald for Saturday April 20, 1889 it was about that time that he left as Reverand for the Parish of Faversham to become Rector for the Church in Lawford. According to the Morning Advertiser for Friday February 13, 1857, page 8, he was born "at the Firs" near Worcester on Monday February 9, 1857 and his father was a "Captain". He was Rector of St Mary Magdalene in Littleton from 1893 until his death in 1933 ( see photo of rectory ) He is buried in the cemetery of this church, Grave C45, an ornmental cross in double kerb. Front: "In beloved memroyh of William Manners Wood M.A. Rector of Littleton 1893-1933 born 9 Feb. 1857 - died 20 June 1933 'Arise, shine: for thy light is gone' Isaiah LX.V.1 Also Gwenellen his wife born 16 July 1890 - died 15th March 1970." On the South side: "Basil Mountray Priest son-in-law of William Mannerw Wood fell asleep 7 August 1933 buried at Lewes 'They were lovely & pleasant in their lives'". The church has a stained glass window in his memory .  He was appointed rector by his cousin Thomas Wood .

 

Rector who is an organ builder” by George A. Wade in Home Words for Heart and Hearth, vol. xlv (1915), pg. 284, reports “The Rev. W. M. Wood, Rector of Littleton Church, near Shepperton, Middlesex, is known far and wide not only as an energetic parish clergyman, but as a musician greatly above the average. The Rector has always been very musical in his tastes, and has, with his organist, made the monthly Sunday organ-recitals in the beautiful little country church at Littleton most successful, and helped in training a very efficient choir. But, though his parishioners know that the rector is a clever exponent of organ music when himself seated at the instrument, not all of them are aware that the rector is one of the finest amateur organ­ builders in the kingdom. The splendid organ at Littleton is certainly unique among instruments in our country churches, in that it cost well over £1,200 to erect, was chiefly designed by the Rector, and was also partly built by him. It possesses several notable features invented by the rector, and since copied by famous builders into other organs. Not least of the novelties is what is known as "the celestial organ," an arrangement that gives very lovely and soft effects, making the music appear to come from a distance - a useful accomplishment in such a small edifice, where otherwise the sound of the organ might almost drown the singing of the people.”


General Notes: Child - Charles Alan Leith Wood


Lt. Indian Army. 1891 census lists his name as Alan C.L. Wood


General Notes: Child - Elinor Millicent Wood


Birth announcement is in the London Evening Standard on July 19, 1883 page 1.


General Notes: Child - Cristopher John Frederick Wood


According to the London Times, June 4, 1912, pg. 4, he was awarded the Silver Medal for Gallantry in Saving Life at Sea while serving as a Lt. in the Royal Navy on HMS Black Prince. On December 11, 1911 he was at the site of the wreck of the Steamship Delhi (of Greenock) which was stranded off Cape Spartel, Morocco. His actions at that time won him the medal. He won the Croix de Guerre for his actions while temporarily in command of ships during action with enemy destroyers on June 23, 1917. He was a Lieutenant Commander in the Royal Navy at the time. The source for this medal is The British Royal Navy, Foreign Awards to Officers Index 1914-1922.

His birth announcement is in the London Daily Standard on November 5, 1884, page 1.
picture

Richardson Wilson

 




Husband Richardson Wilson



 
         Born: 1831
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 
 
     Marriage: 

Events

1. Occupation: Chemist.




Wife



 
         Born: 
   Christened: 
         Died: 
       Buried: 



Children


1 F Vossi Wilson



 


 
         Born: 19 Oct 1863 - Hull, Yorkshire, England
   Christened: 
         Died: 25 Jan 1942
       Buried: 
 
       Spouse: George Alfred Rea (1862-1915)
         Marr: 25 Dec 1886 - St. Michael's Church, Wood Green, Edmonton, England 11



picture

Sources


1 Marriage Allegations in the Registry of the Vicar-General of Canterbur y, 1675.

2 Civil Registration Brecknock 2nd Quater 1860, Vol. 11b pg. 08.

3 Civil Registration Faversham 4th Quarter 1885, Vol. 2a pg. 485.

4 obituary London Times Jan 31, 1865, pg 1.

5 obituary London Times February 24, 1959, pg. 1.

6 Marriage Announcement London Times, Sept 12, 1911, pg 1.

7 Civil Registration Faversham 4th Quarter 1884, Vol. 2a pg. 868.

8 obituary of his son - London Times, 1943.

9 Civil Registration Southampton Vol. 2c, pg. 63. .... <i>Wood Wood</i> (Saturday September 25, 1909 pg 8).

10 obituary London Times August 5, 1886, pg 1.

11 Civil Registration, Edmonton, 4th Quater 1886, vol 3a pg 462.


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